The Latest: Pardoned ranchers released from custodyJuly 10, 2018 11:49pm

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Latest on the pardon by President Donald Trump of two Oregon cattle ranchers convicted of arson (all times local):

4:44 p.m.

A family member says two cattle ranchers convicted of arson pardoned by President Donald Trump have been released from custody.

Lyle Hammond, son of Dwight Hammond, says his father and brother, Steven Hammond, were freed Tuesday. The Hammonds were being held at a federal detention center south of Los Angeles.

Dwight and Steven Hammond were convicted in 2012 of intentionally and maliciously setting fires on public lands. The arson crime carried a minimum prison sentence of five years. But a sympathetic federal judge, on his last day before retirement, decided the penalty was too stiff and gave the father and son much lighter prison terms.

Prosecutors won an appeal, and the Hammonds were resentenced to serve the mandatory minimum.

The decision sparked a protest from Ammon Bundy and dozens of others, who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near the Hammond ranch in southeastern Oregon from Jan. 2 to Feb. 11, 2016.

___

7:34 a.m.

President Donald Trump is pardoning two cattle ranchers convicted of arson in a case that case sparked the armed occupation of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon.

Dwight and Steven Hammond were convicted in 2012 of intentionally and maliciously setting fires on public lands. The arson crime carried a minimum prison sentence of five years, but a sympathetic federal judge, on his last day before retirement, decided the penalty was too stiff and gave the father and son much lighter prison terms.

Prosecutors won an appeal and the Hammonds were resentenced to serve the mandatory minimum.

The decision sparked a protest from Ammon Bundy and dozens of others, who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near the Hammond ranch in southeastern Oregon from Jan. 2 to Feb. 11, 2016.

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