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FILE--In this May 11, 2012, file photo, Sequoia National Park air resource specialist Annie Esperanza explains how ozone diminishes the view from Beetle Rock in Sequoia National Park, Calif. A new study concludes visitors may be steering clear of some U.S. national parks or cutting their visits short because of pollution. (AP Photo/Tracie Cone, file)
Study links air pollution to drop in national park visitorsA new study says visitors may be steering clear of some U.S. national parks or cutting their visits short because of air pollution
The Associated Press2 hours ago
Michelle Williams Reveals Mental Health TreatmentMichelle Williams of Destiny's Child has sought treatment for mental health struggles, the singer revealed on Instagram Tuesday. "For years I have dedicated myself to increasing awareness of mental health and empowering people to recognize when it's time to seek help, support and guidance from those that love and care...
Newser3 hours ago
New law in Baltimore bars sodas from kids' menusA new ordinance in Baltimore bars city restaurants from including sodas and other sugary drinks on kids' menus
The Associated Press3 hours ago
FILE In this Friday, May 9, 2014, file photo, people smoke at a designated area in Tokyo. Japan has approved its first national legislation banning smoking inside of public facilities, but the measure excludes many restaurants and bars and is seen as toothless. The legislation aims to lower secondhand smoking risks ahead of 2020 Tokyo Olympics amid international calls for smoke-free games, but was largely watered down by the reluctant ruling party.  (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
Japan OKs 1st anti-smoking law, but seen as lax and partialJapan approves 1st national smoking ban inside public facilities, but measure excludes many restaurants and bars
The Associated Press6 hours ago
FILE--In this Aug. 11, 2017 file photo, visitors approach a former ranch house and barn during a guided hike on the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge near Denver, land that used to be a buffer zone around a nuclear weapons plant. Environmentalists and community activists are trying to stop the refuge from opening to the public this summer, claiming the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did not adequately study the safety of the site. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott, File)
Judge asked to keep public away from ex-nuke weapons plantEnvironmentalists and community activists are trying to persuade a judge that the public might not be safe on a Colorado wildlife refuge that used to be a buffer zone around a nuclear weapons plant
The Associated Press21 hours ago
More Marital Battles, More Health Problems for MenDisagreeing too often with your spouse could be bad for your health—a finding that might be used to sway arguments in favor of women, as it especially applies to men. It comes from a 16-year study of 373 heterosexual married couples in the US, presented at a recent meeting...
Newser21 hours ago
Planned Parenthood sues Idaho over abortion reporting lawPlanned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands is suing the state of Idaho over new abortion reporting requirements
The Associated Press23 hours ago
FILE - In this March 25, 2016 photo, Director of Chemistry Ravi Swamy, of Aqua Pro-Tech Laboratories, uses inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy to test drinking water samples at the facility, in Fairfield, N.J. A survey of school districts around the country finds that less than half test their water for lead, and among those that do more than a third detected elevated levels of the toxin, according to a federal report released Tuesday. The report, released by the Government Accountability Office, is based on a survey of 549 school districts across the United States. The report estimates that 41 percent of school districts, serving 12 million students, did not test for lead in the water in 2016 and 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
GAO: Less than half of school districts test water for leadFederal report says less than half of school districts test for lead in the drinking water
The Associated Press1 day ago
File - In this March 23, 2017, file photo, health care professionals join hundreds of people marching through downtown Los Angeles protesting President Donald Trump's plan to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. California and 17 other states that sued the Trump administration over its decision to cut off Affordable Care Act subsidies say a workaround has largely succeeded. The assessment came in a court filing late Monday, July 16, 2018, in which the states asked U.S. Judge Vince Chhabria to put their lawsuit on hold. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
States: Workaround succeeding after cut in health subsidiesCalifornia and 17 other states that sued the Trump administration over its decision to cut off Affordable Care Act subsidies say a workaround has largely succeeded
The Associated Press1 day ago
Liver Cancer Death Rate Went Way Up From 2000 to 2016Mortality for all cancers combined has gone down for US adults—but between 2000 and 2016, death rates from liver cancer went up 43%, according to a new CDC report . The cancer itself isn't getting any deadlier—the increase in mortality rates is due to more people developing the disease,...
Newser1 day ago
In this July 11, 2018 photo, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, during a meeting Wednesday. Some Democrats are warning that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh could spell doom for the Affordable Care Act. This is even as some conservatives are portraying him as sympathetic to President Barack Obama’s landmark health care legislation. The heated debate may not matter, though. As long as five past defenders of the ACA remain on the nation’s highest court, the odds tilt in favor of the law being allowed to stand.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Dems see Kavanaugh as Obamacare threat, but law likely safeThe heated debate over how Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh would vote on the Affordable Care Act might not matter. With five past defenders of the ACA still on the nation's highest court, the odds tilt in favor of the law being allowed to stand.
The Associated Press1 day ago
FILE - This Oct. 14, 2015, file photo shows the Food and Drug Administration campus in Silver Spring, Md. The Food and Drug Administration is considering easing the process for drugmakers to get approval to sell some prescription medicines over the counter, a move to offer consumers convenience and lower prices. FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said Tuesday, July 17, 2018 that the agency has developed tentative guidelines for drugmakers to do so, while maintaining safety standards.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
FDA plans to ease OTC approvals for some prescription drugsFDA wants to make it easier for some prescription drugs to be sold over the counter
The Associated Press1 day ago
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